An autumnal tipple and a bonus…

B was in the mood for something “autumnal” when she ran across this little concoction on the Imbibe website. They found the Sinsear, the brainchild of Yvette Leeper-Bueno, owner of Vinatería in Harlem, in the Cherry Bombe: The Cookbook.  Curiously, no mention was made of the name; sinsear is Irish for ancestor?  At any rate, it’s definitely autumnal and thoroughly enjoyable. The Sinsear 2 oz. bourbon 1 oz. apple cider 1 oz. fresh lemon juice 1 oz. simple syrup 1 Tbsp. grated fresh ginger Shake with ice and double strain into a rocks glass. Garnish with a sprig of rosemary.[…]

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The Derby Cocktail

B was thumbing through Ted Haigh‘s Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails, when she ran across what she thought might be a tasty tipple in The Derby.  A quick perusal of the ingredients reveals that it’s awfully similar to one of our all time favorite cocktails, the Oriental Cocktail.  Basically put half as much bourbon as you would rye in an Oriental and up the lime juice and you with the Derby. This version is, according to the good Dr. Cocktail, isone of three versions in the 1947 edition of Trader Vic’s bartending guide and his favorite. The International Bartenders Association’s version[…]

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Blackthorn (Irish Variation)

Astute readers will recall the we previously covered another version of the Blackthorn Cocktail, but which was gin based.  In fact probably the original namesake was called the Blackthorn  after the plum-bearing shrub  that produces the sloe berry (from which we get sloe gin). Philip Greene‘s book The Manhattan … provides this version which he claims (according to the March 18, 1905 edition of the New York Times) to be loosely based on a “Shamrock cocktail”, whose infamy they saw fit to immortalize due to the barman at the Hotel Netherland providing them to the sixty-ninth regiment instead of the[…]

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The Mother-in-Law Cocktail

Today’s post is an homage to that most unjustly maligned group, mother-in-laws.   As exemplified by today’s post, they are, by and large, a fine and noble set.   I found today’s cocktail while perusing Chuck Taggart‘s GumboPages.com (credit given, lest I be ” étoufféed and served to Dr. Lecter, with a nice Chianti.”). This cocktail piqued my interest both by the high praised lavished and by the great backstory.  He does a fantastic job chronicling the tale, and you should definitely go read it. No, seriously, go read it (and then skip the next hackneyed paragraph I’m going to[…]

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The Liberal

Devotees of the blog will doubtless know the esteem in which I hold the Manhattan, which is why we rather assiduously avoid frivolous knockoffs.  Devotees, however, will also know my predilection for quirky and esoteric booze, hence the conflict.  B & I wound up with a bottle of Torani Amer, a version of the original French Amer Picon that is currently unavailable, at least here in the States.  It’s a sufficiently worthy ingredient consider a Manhattan riff.  Torani is a orange bitter liqueur that is a bit like Curaçao, but bitter rather than sweet. We found The Liberal in Ted[…]

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Champagne Whiskey Punch

Summer is the season for festive and refreshing (if slightly frivolous) imbibing with great friends.  I originally made this frivolously festive tipple a couple years back for the adherents of the Bacchic Villa after finding the recipe in an issue of Imbibe Magazine.  Apparently this marvelous potation is the creation of one Joy Richard, a member of some standing of an even more fantastic society, LUPEC (Ladies United for the Preservation of Endangered Cocktails). Unfortunately, when I made it, I was in no fit state to take a picture of the creation for the blog, so it fell last weekend[…]

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Whoa, Nellie!

As even the occasional reader of this blog can attest, we generally are a bit circumspect when it comes to newly minted cocktails.  When we were reading Ti Adelaide Martin and Lally Brennan’s book, In the Land of Cocktails, and they described being at Lally’s house for the first Marti Gras after Katrina and wanting to make a new cocktail and enlisting the help of Ted, “Doc Cocktail” Haigh to come up with one, we thought this should definitely merit an exception.  As an aside, in addition to the cocktail having respectable amount of hooch in it, Nellie Valentine was their grandmother, so[…]

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The Russell Cocktail

This is a CocktailswithM first—a cocktail of our own creation.  Normally we stay away from this because 1) in more than a century of mixing a limited number of ingredients together, it’s probably already been done, and 2) if it hasn’t been written down  before, it probably sucks.   That being said, an occasion arose for violating this sensibility.    Last spring I ran across articles in both Imbibe Magazine and by David Lebovitz describing how to make an Italian green walnut liqueur called Nocino—Lebovitz calls it liqueur de noix, as he lives in Paris.  As green walnuts are readily available for[…]

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The Graduate

A bit of a short post in the continuing tribute to Imbibe Magazine’s quartet of “Simple Cocktails”.  Unlike the High Noon that cleverly paired several ingrediets that go very well together (tequila and triple sec, tequila and grapfruit juice, grapfruit and Campari), this cocktail takes on a more recalictrant loner of an ingrediet, Scotch.  The cocktail is the creation of Daniel Shoemaker of Teardrop Lounge in Portland, Oregon.  It starts out in a familiar territory by adding sweet vermouth, a la Rob Roy, but then decidedly ventures toward citrus and refreshing with curacao and tonic—a direction rarely associated with either[…]

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Derby Day

As yesterday was the 140th running of the Kentucky Derby, it seemed an auspicious time to revive the blog after an eleven moth hiatus, and what else could one comment on that the venerable Mint Julep.   Doubtless you are thinking that quite enough on this subject has already been written.   Well, you got me there, but I am going to plow ahead anyway. First, just a bit of history compliments of David Wondrich‘s Imbibe.  Apparently juleps date back to around 900 a.d. as  floral or herbal infusions with sugar taken as medicine, as state that it stayed until about the[…]

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