The Journalist Cocktail

As most people know, B & I are unapologetic in our assertion that the modern martini is undrinkable.  First off, it’s usually not a martini; it’s strained gin with an olive.  Secondly, I just can’t get my head around gin and dry vermouth (at say 4 or 5:1).  The martini’s predecessor, the Martinez, is interesting, although a little overly sweet as it has the sweet Old Tom gin, sweet vermouth and maraschino liqueur.  Even though both of us are diehard Manhattan drinkers, we both think there has to be a great Martini-based cocktail.  We definitely plan to give both the[…]

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French Pearl

I was flipping through Twitter yesterday when I noticed an interesting tweet about a cocktail called a French Pearl from the self-described “dowager bartender and industry Den mother”, Audrey Saunders.  She also happens to be a pillar of the cocktail world and proprietor of the New York’s legendary Pegu Club.  In her tweet she describes the French Pearl with “think of it as a Plymouth Gin mojito, then add a dribble of Pernod”.  Sold.  I curiously don’t have Pernod…  I definitely should.  What I do have is a couple of actual absinthes so I decided to call it good. In[…]

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The Running of the Gins

Recently B connected two saliently fortuitous details. 1) Our cocktail bookshelf has at least two volumes dedicated to gin, and 2) we have a copious examples of gins in our cabinet. Seemed  like a prime opportunity for a couple of academics to make a scholarly study of the subject. And realizing the importance of peer review in all scholarly endeavors, we decided to bring in long-time friend, scholar and fellow boozehound, Briana, as well. A careful review of Aaron Knoll‘s Gin: The Art and Craft of the Artisan Revival provided a detailed framework for exactly how to taste gin, including[…]

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Leap Year Cocktail

Certain cocktails just seem timely, if perhaps obvious.  The Leap Year Cocktail seems to fit that description.  It’s an odd sort of cocktail for, well, an odd sort of year.  Brenda actually ran across on thumbing through Robert Hess’s The Essential Bartender’s Guide and then found that he made it on his Cocktail Spirit video series.   Among the mixologic oddities of this cocktail is the fact that we actually know its provenance.  It was invented by bartender Harry Craddock on February 29, 1928 for a celebration at the Savoy Hotel in London, according to the 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book.  It[…]

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The Edgewood

In looking over our list of possible cocktails, I ran across one we had been considering for quite a while.  Today’s entry is actually the modern creation of  bartender Greg Best, then of Holeman & Finch in Atlanta and appeared in Imbibe Magazine in 2009.  We actually tried (and photographed) it back it 2011, and had to have another go at it today as a refresher.  And a good decision it was.  What first attracted me to this modern potation was it’s classic style…just a few venerable old ingredients, with a twist (the grapefruit and the Lillet) to give it[…]

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Patricia Anne

Today’s post concludes a tetralogy base on the Imbibe Magazine article “Simple 4 Ingredient Cocktails“.  But before we have a go at the cocktail, astute reader may notice that the blog has a new name and a new look.  B and I decided to start hosting our blogs (and thereby get rid of the annoying ads), which seemed an auspicious occasion to change the name of the old CocktailsWithM.wordpress.com to the new MolecularDrinking.com.  All of the old posts are now here.  While the old blog will continue to exist, new posts, including this one, will only appear on Molecular Drinking.[…]

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Satan’s Whiskers

With the start of the new year, it’s time to resume blogging.  Last year was not an epic year for the blog, though we had some good moments.  To kick the new year off, I decided (B actually told me) to change the theme.  We’ll see if this one has legs. I also realized that probably the very first cocktail I found to make for B hadn’t been blogged about, a Satan’s Whiskers.  I first ran across this one on Robert Hess’ DrinkBoy.com site.  He subsequently made a video as part of his Cocktail Spirit series for SmallScreenNetwork.  At some[…]

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Pegu Club

The last post on the blog, Intro to Aperol, by Audrey Saunders at Pegu Club, got me thinking about the name sake of that establishment:  the orginal Pegu Club, in Burma. The 1930 edition of Harry Craddock’s The Savoy Cocktail Book (I have the reprint edition) describes it as “The favorite cocktail of the Pegu Club, Burma, and one that has travelled, and is asked for, round the world.”.  Well, who am I to question Harry Craddock. Pegu Club Cocktail 2 oz. Dry Gin 1 oz. Curaçao 1 tsp. Lime Juice 1 dash Angostura Bitters 1 dash Orange Bitters Shake[…]

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The Income Tax Cocktail

The tax man cometh here at CocktailswithM. And by way of balm to solace our ragged nerves, we have today’s post. After a bit of digging in to the back story on the Income Tax cocktail, I have to confess to be about as stymied  as I was on Form 8949 of Schedule D.  The recipe we used came from Ted Haigh’s Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails.  In it, he claims he and a friend of his Richard Corsini did quite a bit of research before identifying this cocktail as the Income Tax.  Originally they called it a “Bronx with[…]

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The Blue Moon Cocktail

I ran across this cocktail back in the September, 2009 issue of Imbibe and decided I really should give it a try.  When you have a bottle of crème yvette or a bottle of crème de violette, you don’t pass up opportunities.  Astute cocktail drinkers will quickly recognize the similarity between this and the original recipe for the Aviation Cocktail.  The key difference is that the Blue Moon, doesn’t contain Maraschino liqueur and contains a lot less lemon juice.  In Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails (from which Imbibe took it’s recipe), Ted Haigh (a.k.a. Dr. Cocktail) mentions that in its[…]

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