Aperoni

B forwarded me a post from Michael Rhuhulman’s blog about a Berkshire Martinez from last April, which was his take on the classic Martinez cocktail.  Apparently this post was inspired by a robust (such as 140 characters will allow) Twitter discussion of his previous post on The Perfect Martini started by Gerry Jobe, bartender at RauDZ.  I was preparing to give the Martinez a whirls when I caught passing comment by Jobe that a “Punt e Mes for its bitter quality works extremely well with Aperol (substituted for Campari) as a Negroni variation”.  Well, I’m always game for cocktails that[…]

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Negroni

Last Friday, the lab decided it needed a “spontaneous act of happy hour” at Briana’s house.  She had the comestible well in hand, which left the libation in our hands.  Knowing gin was a popular favorite with all of the revelers, my mind wandered the the Negroni. Tasty, portable and gin based. No problem. The backstory on the Negroni’s a little dubious, but still worth repeating.  According to Eric Felten’s How’s your Drink?,  A book by bartender and author Luca Picchi called Sulle Tracce de Conte gives credit for the invention of the cocktail to Count Cammillo Negroni, who asked[…]

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Lucien Gaudin Cocktail

B & I were just settling in to enjoy a cocktail in front of the newly erected Christmas tree discuss hors d’oeuvres for our impending Christmas party. I was in the mood for something new with Rye and turned to the good Doctor’s Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails.  In doing so, we got a bit of a Christmas surprise.  First, the cocktail that popped out, didn’t have rye.  Secondly, it really is a great cocktail. The Lucien Gaudin Cocktail is a prohibition era cocktail named after the famous four time gold medal winning French fencer (He won two in Paris[…]

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The Twentieth Century Cocktail

I think I’ll start this post off with a disclosure and a disclosure on the disclosure in the form of a confession.  Confused?  It all started a couple of weeks ago when, much to my surprise, I received a bottle of gin from a public relations firm representing New Amsterdam gin.  So there’s the disclosure, they’re bribing me with liquor (I don’t know where they got the idea that such practices might work with cocktail bloggers). Now the confession/followup disclosure.  New Amsterdam gin has been my standard gin for the last couple of years.  My good friend Robert Ullrey turned[…]

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French 75

The French 75 has bcome something of a New Year’s Day tradition for B & me.  Sadly, it is something of a leftover drink for us.  As it requires sparkling wine, I just don’t seem to ever open up a bottle just to make this cocktail,  which is a shame since it is such an enjoyable drink. The French 75 dates from the big war.  It was a favorite amount the denizens of the officers club. It takes its name from the French 75-millimeter M1897 canon, a.k.a the French 75, which was the mainstay of the French field artillery during[…]

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On naming a cocktail

B likes grapefruit juice, so I am always on the lookout for a good grapefruit juice based cocktail (see our last post on The Blinker).  So when I got a Twitter feed to a Facebook link for a cocktail called the Sapphire Savoy, I decided I would give it a whirl.   Now at this point two things are probably coming to mind.  1)  Twitter? Facebook?  Are you sure you have a wife and don’t live in your mother’s basement? and 2)  Where did they come up with that name?  In answer to 1)  Yes. I’m sure.  In answer to 2)[…]

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Drinking advice for the undead

First let me say it again.  I love absinthe.  The real stuff. This cocktail comes from a whole family that dates back to the late 19th century.  Credit for this particular version, according to Ted “Dr. Cocktail” Haigh’s Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails, is given to the #2 Savoy barman, Harry Craddock. This is one of those great classic era drinks that highlights the alchemy of a truly great cocktail. The Corpse Reviver #2 1 oz. Gin 1 oz. Cointreau 1 oz. Lillet Blanc 1 oz. Fresh Lemon Juice. 1-3 drops absinthe (I went with 3-see line 1) Shake with[…]

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The Aviation Cocktail

I’ve been thinking about his one for a while. It started out as something to do with a recently acquired bottle of creme de violette, which in turn was the result of my endless quest for arcane booze. In many ways this cocktail is the embodiment of this quest, having not only creme de violette but also Maraschino liqueur. The recipe I used is from David Wondrich’s Imbibe, his take on Jerry Thomas’s original Bartender’s Guide. Even though the cocktail gained prominence with Harry Cradocks Savoy Cocktail Book from 1930, the cocktail predates prohibition-the earliest mention Wondrich finds was a[…]

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The Pink Lady

Haigh also points out that you can go into any bar and, if you dare, order one, and you will never get the right thing (he argues that this is the original version of the drink).  Cocktaildb.com has no less that seven versions of the drink, containing varying ingredients including cream.  Yikes.  So, unless you are on pretty intimate negotiating terms with your bartender, this is one probably best enjoyed at home. The Pink Lady 1 1/2 oz gin 1/2 oz applejack Juice of half a lemon 1 egg white 2 dashes real pomegranate grenadine Shake vigorously and strain into[…]

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The Blackthorn Cocktail

I was in the mood for something I hadn’t heard of before.  Not new, just new to me.  B was also thinking some thing with Dubonnet Rouge.  According to the good Doctor’s Vintage Cocktails and Forgotten Spirits (now in a new edition that lays flat on the counter), versions of this cocktial have been around since the nineteenth century with his version being a later edition.  The Blackthorn is named after the plum-bearing shrub  that produces the sloe berry (from which we get sloe gin).  This version, interestingly, has no sloe gin.  Haigh claims that the the cocktail has a[…]

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